Perspectives on determinate sentencing
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Perspectives on determinate sentencing a selected bibliography by Pointer, W. Donald.

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Published by U.S. Dept. of Justice, National Institute of Justice, For sale by the Supt. of Docs., U.S. G.P.O. in Washington, D.C .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • United States

Subjects:

  • Sentences (Criminal procedure) -- United States -- Bibliography.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementcompiled by W. Donald Pointer, Cindy Rosenstein ; National Institute of Justice/NCJRS.
ContributionsRosenstein, Cindy., National Criminal Justice Reference Service (U.S.), National Institute of Justice (U.S.), Aspen Systems Corporation.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsKF9685.A1 P64 1982
The Physical Object
Paginationxi, 90 p. ;
Number of Pages90
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL3142125M
LC Control Number82602880

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This book discusses in depth the rise and fall of the determinate ideal, once heralded as a replacement to the old order of criminal justice. Using new materials and combining political, empirical, and theoretical perspectives, Griset examines the attempt in New York State to establish determinate sentencing -- "punishment for its own sake" -- to replace the existing policy of rehabilitation. This book discusses in depth the rise and fall of the determinate ideal, once heralded as a replacement to the old order of criminal justice. Using new materials and combining political, empirical, and theoretical perspectives, Griset examines the attempt in New York State to establish determinate sentencing ― “punishment for its own sake” ― to replace the existing policy of Cited by: determinate sentencing reforms begun in the early s. As a punitive crime-control strategy, the foundation of "truth in sentencing" was primarily built within the victims' rights movement which began to emerge across the nation during the same time period. Sentencing and correctional patterns have greatly shifted since the Size: KB. A determinate sentence is a jail or prison sentence that has a defined length and can’t be changed by a parole board or other agency. For example, a sentence of six months in the county jail is determinate, because the prisoner will spend six months behind bars (minus time off for good behavior, work-release, or other alternatives to in-custody time, when applicable).Author: Janet Portman, Attorney.

  Determinate sentencing occurs when a judge must sentence a convicted offender to a standard sentence that is dictated by the law. This most often comes with drug convictions, but there are other examples that are on the books, such as the three strikes laws that require a life sentence on someone’s third specific felony conviction. This book discusses in depth the rise and fall of the determinate ideal, once heralded as a replacement to the old order of criminal justice. Using new materials and combining political, empirical, and theoretical perspectives, Griset examines the attempt in New York State to establish determinate sentencing -- "punishment for its own sake. Conference discussions tended to polarize around arguments for and against determinate and indeterminate sentencing. Many viewed determinate sentencing as the more just and effective sentencing approach from a deterrence perspective, while its opponents viewed it as focusing on imprisonment as punishment while alternatives to imprisonment would. Determinate sentencing laws have lead to a reduction in the number of incarcerations. One of the first examples of the social ecological model of crime is Shaw and McKay's classic book. Which of the following perspectives believes that individuals can alter their environment to discourage criminal activity?

6. A determinate sentencing system is one in which discretion in fixing the term of incarcer-ation is withdrawn from the judge or other sentencing authority and replaced by a legislatively determined term, either fixed or narrowly variable, for each defined crime. See text accompany-ing notes infra. by: 3. Methods. Data on a cohort of , inmates admitted to prison in Florida over a twelve year period before and after the enactment of a “truth-in-sentencing” law in requiring all felons sentenced to prison to serve a minimum 85% of their sentence are examined to assess the impact of determinate punishment on whether inmates commit disciplinary infractions and the frequency of by: A determinate prison sentence is where the court sets a fixed length for the prison sentence and is the most common type of prison sentence. For example, an offender may be sentenced to four years in prison. This is the maximum period of time the offender could spend in prison. However, the offender will not necessarily spend the whole of this.   Indeterminate sentencing is the sentencing of a range of jail time to an individual convicted of a crime, such as one to three years. This is the opposite of determinate sentencing, which is the sentencing of an individual to a set amount of jail time, such as one year, or three years. However, an inmate with a determinate sentence can still be.